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Versions: (draft-matsushima-spring-dmm-srv6-mobile-uplane) 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

DMM Working Group                                     S. Matsushima, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                  SoftBank
Intended status: Standards Track                             C. Filsfils
Expires: January 14, 2021                                       M. Kohno
                                                       P. Camarillo, Ed.
                                                     Cisco Systems, Inc.
                                                                D. Voyer
                                                             Bell Canada
                                                              C. Perkins
                                                               Futurewei
                                                           July 13, 2020


               Segment Routing IPv6 for Mobile User Plane
                  draft-ietf-dmm-srv6-mobile-uplane-09

Abstract

   This document shows the applicability of SRv6 (Segment Routing IPv6)
   to the user-plane of mobile networks.  The network programming nature
   of SRv6 accomplish mobile user-plane functions in a simple manner.
   The statelessness of SRv6 and its ability to control both service
   layer path and underlying transport can be beneficial to the mobile
   user-plane, providing flexibility, end-to-end network slicing and SLA
   control for various applications.  This document describes the SRv6
   mobile user plane.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 14, 2021.








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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Conventions and Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.3.  Predefined SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors  . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  A 3GPP Reference Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  User-plane behaviors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     5.1.  Traditional mode  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
       5.1.1.  Packet flow - Uplink  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       5.1.2.  Packet flow - Downlink  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.2.  Enhanced Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
       5.2.1.  Packet flow - Uplink  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
       5.2.2.  Packet flow - Downlink  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     5.3.  Enhanced mode with unchanged gNB GTP behavior . . . . . .  11
       5.3.1.  Interworking with IPv6 GTP  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
       5.3.2.  Interworking with IPv4 GTP  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
       5.3.3.  Extensions to the interworking mechanisms . . . . . .  17
     5.4.  SRv6 Drop-in Interworking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   6.  SRv6 Segment Endpoint Mobility Behaviors  . . . . . . . . . .  18
     6.1.  Args.Mob.Session  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     6.2.  End.MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
     6.3.  End.M.GTP6.D  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     6.4.  End.M.GTP6.D.Di . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
     6.5.  End.M.GTP6.E  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
     6.6.  End.M.GTP4.E  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     6.7.  H.M.GTP4.D  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
     6.8.  End.Limit: Rate Limiting behavior . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   7.  SRv6 supported 3GPP PDU session types . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   8.  Network Slicing Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   9.  Control Plane Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25



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   10. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   11. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
   12. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
   13. Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
   14. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
     14.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
     14.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
   Appendix A.  Implementations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29

1.  Introduction

   In mobile networks, mobility management systems provide connectivity
   over a wireless link to stationary and non-stationary nodes.  The
   user-plane establishes a tunnel between the mobile node and its
   anchor node over IP-based backhaul and core networks.

   This document shows the applicability of SRv6 (Segment Routing IPv6)
   to mobile networks.

   Segment Routing [RFC8402] is a source routing architecture: a node
   steers a packet through an ordered list of instructions called
   "segments".  A segment can represent any instruction, topological or
   service based.

   SRv6 applied to mobile networks enables a source-routing based mobile
   architecture, where operators can explicitly indicate a route for the
   packets to and from the mobile node.  The SRv6 Endpoint nodes serve
   as mobile user-plane anchors.

2.  Conventions and Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

2.1.  Terminology

   o  CNF: Cloud-native Network Function
   o  NFV: Network Function Virtualization
   o  PDU: Packet Data Unit
   o  PDU Session: Context of an UE connects to a mobile network.
   o  UE: User Equipment
   o  UPF: User Plane Function
   o  VNF: Virtual Network Function (including CNFs)

   The following terms used within this document are defined in
   [RFC8402]: Segment Routing, SR Domain, Segment ID (SID), SRv6, SRv6



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   SID, Active Segment, SR Policy, Prefix SID, Adjacency SID and Binding
   SID.

   The following terms used within this document are defined in
   [RFC8754]: SRH, SR Source Node, Transit Node, SR Segment Endpoint
   Node and Reduced SRH.

   The following terms used within this document are defined in [NET-
   PGM]: NH, SL, FIB, SA, DA, SRv6 SID behavior, SRv6 Segment Endpoint
   Behavior.

2.2.  Conventions

   An SR Policy is resolved to a SID list.  A SID list is represented as
   <S1, S2, S3> where S1 is the first SID to visit, S2 is the second SID
   to visit and S3 is the last SID to visit along the SR path.

   (SA,DA) (S3, S2, S1; SL) represents an IPv6 packet with:

   - Source Address is SA, Destination Address is DA, and next-header is
     SRH
   - SRH with SID list <S1, S2, S3> with Segments Left = SL
   - Note the difference between the <> and () symbols: <S1, S2, S3>
     represents a SID list where S1 is the first SID and S3 is the last
     SID to traverse.  (S3, S2, S1; SL) represents the same SID list but
     encoded in the SRH format where the rightmost SID in the SRH is the
     first SID and the leftmost SID in the SRH is the last SID.  When
     referring to an SR policy in a high-level use-case, it is simpler
     to use the <S1, S2, S3> notation.  When referring to an
     illustration of the detailed packet behavior, the (S3, S2, S1; SL)
     notation is more convenient.
   - The payload of the packet is omitted.

   SRH[n]: A shorter representation of Segment List[n], as defined in
   [RFC8754].  SRH[SL] can be different from the DA of the IPv6 header.

   o  gNB::1 is an IPv6 address (SID) assigned to the gNB.
   o  U1::1 is an IPv6 address (SID) assigned to UPF1.
   o  U2::1 is an IPv6 address (SID) assigned to UPF2.
   o  U2:: is some other IPv6 address (SID) assigned to UPF2.

2.3.  Predefined SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors

   The following SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors are defined in
   [I-D.ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming].

   o  End.DT4: decapsulate and forward using a specific IPv4 table
      lookup.



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   o  End.DT6: decapsulate and forward using a specific IPv6 table
      lookup.
   o  End.DX4: decapsulate the packet and forward through a particular
      outgoing interface -or set of OIFs- configured with the SID.
   o  End.DX6: decapsulate and forward through a particular outgoing
      interface -or set of OIFs- configured with the SID.
   o  End.DX2: decapsulate the L2 frame and forward through a particular
      outgoing interface -or set of OIFs- configured with the SID.
   o  End.T: forward through the shortest path using a specific IPv6
      table.
   o  End.X: forward through an L3 adjacency with the SID.

   New SRv6 behaviors are defined in Section 6 of this document to
   mechanisms described in this document.

3.  Motivation

   Mobile networks are becoming more challenging to operate.  On one
   hand, traffic is constantly growing, and latency requirements are
   tighter; on the other-hand, there are new use-cases like distributed
   NFVi that are also challenging network operations.

   The current architecture of mobile networks does not take into
   account the underlying transport.  The user-plane is rigidly
   fragmented into radio access, core and service networks, connected by
   tunneling according to user-plane roles such as access and anchor
   nodes.  These factors have made it difficult for the operator to
   optimize and operate the data-path.

   In the meantime, applications have shifted to use IPv6, and network
   operators have started adopting IPv6 as their IP transport.  SRv6,
   the IPv6 dataplane instantiation of Segment Routing [RFC8402],
   integrates both the application data-path and the underlying
   transport layer into a single protocol, allowing operators to
   optimize the network in a simplified manner and removing forwarding
   state from the network.  It is also suitable for virtualized
   environments, like VNF/CNF to VNF/CNF networking.

   SRv6 defines the network-programming concept
   [I-D.ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming].  Applied to mobility,
   SRv6 can provide the user-plane behaviors needed for mobility
   management.  SRv6 takes advantage of the underlying transport
   awareness and flexibility together with the ability to also include
   services to optimize the end-to-end mobile dataplane.

   The use-cases for SRv6 mobility are discussed in
   [I-D.camarilloelmalky-springdmm-srv6-mob-usecases].




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4.  A 3GPP Reference Architecture

   This section presents a reference architecture and possible
   deployment scenarios.

   Figure 1 shows a reference diagram from the 5G packet core
   architecture [TS.23501].

   The user plane described in this document does not depend on any
   specific architecture.  The 5G packet core architecture as shown is
   based on the latest 3GPP standards at the time of writing this draft.

                                  +-----+
                                  | AMF |
                                  +-----+
                                 /    | [N11]
                          [N2]  /  +-----+
                        +------/   | SMF |
                       /           +-----+
                      /              / \
                     /              /   \  [N4]
                    /              /     \                    ________
                   /              /       \                  /        \
   +--+      +-----+ [N3] +------+  [N9]  +------+  [N6]    /          \
   |UE|------| gNB |------| UPF1 |--------| UPF2 |--------- \    DN    /
   +--+      +-----+      +------+        +------+           \________/

                 Figure 1: 3GPP 5G Reference Architecture

   o  gNB: gNodeB with N3 interface towards packet core (and N2 for
      control plane)
   o  UPF1: UPF with Interfaces N3 and N9 (and N4 for control plane)
   o  UPF2: UPF with Interfaces N9 and N6 (and N4 for control plane)
   o  SMF: Session Management Function
   o  AMF: Access and Mobility Management Function
   o  DN: Data Network e.g. operator services, Internet access

   This reference diagram does not depict a UPF that is only connected
   to N9 interfaces, although the description in this document also work
   for such UPFs.

   Each session from a UE gets assigned to a UPF.  Sometimes multiple
   UPFs may be used, providing richer service functions.  A UE gets its
   IP address from the DHCP block of its UPF.  The UPF advertises that
   IP address block toward the Internet, ensuring that return traffic is
   routed to the right UPF.





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5.  User-plane behaviors

   This section introduces an SRv6 based mobile user-plane.

   In order to simplify the adoption of SRv6, we present two different
   "modes" that vary with respect to the use of SRv6.  The first one is
   the "Traditional mode", which inherits the current 3GPP mobile user-
   plane.  In this mode GTP-U [TS.29281] is replaced by SRv6, however
   the N3, N9 and N6 interfaces are still point-to-point interfaces with
   no intermediate waypoints as in the current mobile network
   architecture.

   The second mode is the "Enhanced mode".  This is an evolution from
   the "Traditional mode".  In this mode the N3, N9 or N6 interfaces
   have intermediate waypoints -SIDs- that are used for Traffic
   Engineering or VNF purposes.  This results in optimal end-to-end
   policies across the mobile network with transport and services
   awareness.

   In both, the Traditional and the Enhanced modes, we assume that the
   gNB as well as the UPFs are SR-aware (N3, N9 and -potentially- N6
   interfaces are SRv6).

   In addition to those two modes, we introduce two mechanisms for
   interworking with legacy access networks (those where the N3
   interface is unmodified).  In this document we introduce them as a
   variant to the Enhanced mode, however they are equally applicable to
   the Traditional mode.

   One of these mechanisms is designed to interwork with legacy gNBs
   using GTP/IPv4.  The second mechanism is designed to interwork with
   legacy gNBs using GTP/IPv6.

   This document uses SRv6 Segment Endpoint Behaviors defined in
   [I-D.ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming] as well as new SRv6
   Segment Endpoint Behaviors designed for the mobile user plane that
   are defined in this document Section 6.

5.1.  Traditional mode

   In the traditional mode, the existing mobile UPFs remain unchanged
   except for the use of SRv6 as the data plane instead of GTP-U.  There
   is no impact to the rest of the mobile system.

   In existing 3GPP mobile networks, a PDU Session is mapped 1-for-1
   with a specific GTP tunnel (TEID).  This 1-for-1 mapping is mirrored
   here to replace GTP encapsulation with the SRv6 encapsulation, while




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   not changing anything else.  There will be a unique SRv6 SID
   associated with each PDU Session.

   The traditional mode minimizes the changes required to the mobile
   system; hence it is a good starting point for forming a common
   ground.

   Our example topology is shown in Figure 2.  In traditional mode the
   gNB and the UPFs are SR-aware.  In the descriptions of the uplink and
   downlink packet flow, A is an IPv6 address of the UE, and Z is an
   IPv6 address reachable within the Data Network DN.  A new SRv6
   function End.MAP, defined in Section 6.2, is used.

                                                              ________
                     SRv6           SRv6                     /        \
   +--+      +-----+ [N3] +------+  [N9]  +------+  [N6]    /          \
   |UE|------| gNB |------| UPF1 |--------| UPF2 |--------- \    DN    /
   +--+      +-----+      +------+        +------+           \________/
            SRv6 node     SRv6 node       SRv6 node

               Figure 2: Traditional mode - example topology

5.1.1.  Packet flow - Uplink

   The uplink packet flow is as follows:

         UE_out  : (A,Z)
         gNB_out : (gNB, U1::1) (A,Z)     -> H.Encaps.Red <U1::1>
         UPF1_out: (gNB, U2::1) (A,Z)     -> End.MAP
         UPF2_out: (A,Z)                  -> End.DT4 or End.DT6

   When the UE packet arrives at the gNB, the gNB performs a
   H.Encaps.Red operation.  Since there is only one SID, there is no
   need to push an SRH. gNB only adds an outer IPv6 header with IPv6 DA
   U1::1.  U1::1 represents an anchoring SID specific for that session
   at UPF1. gNB obtains the SID U1::1 from the existing control plane
   (N2 interface).

   When the packet arrives at UPF1, the SID U1::1 identifies a local
   End.MAP function.  End.MAP replaces U1::1 by U2::1, that belongs to
   the next UPF (U2).

   When the packet arrives at UPF2, the SID U2::1 corresponds to an
   End.DT function.  UPF2 decapsulates the packet, performs a lookup in
   a specific table associated with that mobile network and forwards the
   packet toward the data network (DN).





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5.1.2.  Packet flow - Downlink

   The downlink packet flow is as follows:

       UPF2_in : (Z,A)
       UPF2_out: (U2::, U1::2) (Z,A)    -> H.Encaps.Red <U1::2>
       UPF1_out: (U2::, gNB::1) (Z,A)   -> End.MAP
       gNB_out : (Z,A)                  -> End.DX4, End.DX6, End.DX2

   When the packet arrives at the UPF2, the UPF2 maps that flow into a
   PDU Session.  This PDU Session is associated with the segment
   endpoint <U1::2>.  UPF2 performs a H.Encaps.Red operation,
   encapsulating the packet into a new IPv6 header with no SRH since
   there is only one SID.

   Upon packet arrival on UPF1, the SID U1::2 is a local End.MAP
   function.  This function maps the SID to the next anchoring point and
   replaces U1::2 by gNB::1, that belongs to the next hop.

   Upon packet arrival on gNB, the SID gNB::1 corresponds to an End.DX4,
   End.DX6 or End.DX2 behavior (depending on PDU Session Type).  The gNB
   decapsulates the packet, removing the IPv6 header and all its
   extensions headers, and forwards the traffic toward the UE.

5.2.  Enhanced Mode

   Enhanced mode improves scalability, provides traffic engineering
   capabilities and allows service programming
   [I-D.ietf-spring-sr-service-programming], thanks to the use of
   multiple SIDs in the SID list (instead of a direct connectivity in
   between UPFs with no intermediate waypoints as in Traditional Mode).

   Thus, the main difference is that the SR policy MAY include SIDs for
   traffic engineering and service programming in addition to the
   anchoring SIDs at UPFs.

   Additionally in this mode the operator may choose to aggregate
   several devices under the same SID list (e.g. stationary residential
   meters connected to the same cell) to improve scalability.

   The gNB control-plane (N2 interface) is unchanged, specifically a
   single IPv6 address is provided to the gNB.

   The gNB MAY resolve the IP address received via the control plane
   into a SID list using a mechanism like PCEP, DNS-lookup, LISP
   control-plane or others.





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   Note that the SIDs MAY use the arguments Args.Mob.Session if required
   by the UPFs.

   Figure 3 shows an Enhanced mode topology.  In the Enhanced mode, the
   gNB and the UPF are SR-aware.  The Figure shows two service segments,
   S1 and C1.  S1 represents a VNF in the network, and C1 represents an
   intermediate router used for Traffic Engineering purposes to enforce
   a low-latency path in the network.  Note that both S1 and C1 are not
   required to have an N4 interface.

                                    +----+  SRv6               _______
                    SRv6          --| C1 |--[N3]              /       \
   +--+    +-----+  [N3]         /  +----+  \  +------+ [N6] /         \
   |UE|----| gNB |--       SRv6 /    SRv6    --| UPF2 |------\   DN    /
   +--+    +-----+  \      [N3]/      TE       +------+       \_______/
          SRv6 node  \ +----+ /               SRv6 node
                      -| S1 |-
                       +----+
                      SRv6 node
                        VNF

                Figure 3: Enhanced mode - Example topology

5.2.1.  Packet flow - Uplink

   The uplink packet flow is as follows:

  UE_out  : (A,Z)
  gNB_out : (gNB, S1)(U2::1, C1; SL=2)(A,Z)-> H.Encaps.Red<S1,C1,U2::1>
  S1_out  : (gNB, C1)(U2::1, C1; SL=1)(A,Z)
  C1_out  : (gNB, U2::1)(A,Z)              -> PSP
  UPF2_out: (A,Z)                          -> End.DT4, End.DT6, End.DT2U

   UE sends its packet (A,Z) on a specific bearer to its gNB.  gNB's
   control plane associates that session from the UE(A) with the IPv6
   address B.  gNB's control plane does a lookup on B to find the
   related SID list <S1, C1, U2::1>.

   When gNB transmits the packet, it contains all the segments of the SR
   policy.  The SR policy includes segments for traffic engineering (C1)
   and for service programming (S1).

   Nodes S1 and C1 perform their related Endpoint functionality and
   forward the packet.

   When the packet arrives at UPF2, the active segment (U2::1) is an
   End.DT4/End.DT6/End.DT2U which performs the decapsulation (removing




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   the IPv6 header with all its extension headers) and forwards toward
   the data network.

5.2.2.  Packet flow - Downlink

   The downlink packet flow is as follows:

 UPF2_in : (Z,A)                              -> UPF2 maps the flow w/
                                                 SID list <C1,S1, gNB>
 UPF2_out: (U2::1, C1)(gNB, S1; SL=2)(Z,A)    -> H.Encaps.Red
 C1_out  : (U2::1, S1)(gNB, S1; SL=1)(Z,A)
 S1_out  : (U2::1, gNB)(Z,A)                  -> PSP
 gNB_out : (Z,A)                              -> End.DX4/End.DX6/End.DX2

   When the packet arrives at the UPF2, the UPF2 maps that particular
   flow into a UE PDU Session.  This UE PDU Session is associated with
   the policy <C1, S1, gNB>.  The UPF2 performs a H.Encaps.Red
   operation, encapsulating the packet into a new IPv6 header with its
   corresponding SRH.

   The nodes C1 and S1 perform their related Endpoint processing.

   Once the packet arrives at the gNB, the IPv6 DA corresponds to an
   End.DX4, End.DX6 or End.DX2 behavior at the gNB (depending on the
   underlying traffic).  The gNB decapsulates the packet, removing the
   IPv6 header and forwards the traffic toward the UE.

5.3.  Enhanced mode with unchanged gNB GTP behavior

   This section describes three mechanisms for interworking with legacy
   gNBs that still use GTP: one for IPv4, the other for IPv6.

   In the interworking scenarios as illustrated in Figure 4, gNB does
   not support SRv6.  gNB supports GTP encapsulation over IPv4 or IPv6.
   To achieve interworking, a SR Gateway (SRGW-UPF1) entity is added.
   The SRGW maps the GTP traffic into SRv6.

   The SRGW is not an anchor point and maintains very little state.  For
   this reason, both IPv4 and IPv6 methods scale to millions of UEs.

                                                              _______
                     IP GTP          SRv6                    /       \
    +--+      +-----+ [N3] +------+  [N9]  +------+  [N6]   /         \
    |UE|------| gNB |------| UPF1 |--------| UPF2 |---------\   DN    /
    +--+      +-----+      +------+        +------+          \_______/
                          SR Gateway       SRv6 node

                Figure 4: Example topology for interworking



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   Both of the mechanisms described in this section are applicable to
   either the Traditional Mode or the Enhanced Mode.

5.3.1.  Interworking with IPv6 GTP

   In this interworking mode the gNB at the N3 interface uses GTP over
   IPv6.

   Key points:

   o  The gNB is unchanged (control-plane or user-plane) and
      encapsulates into GTP (N3 interface is not modified).
   o  The 5G Control-Plane (N2 interface) is unmodified; one IPv6
      address is needed (i.e. a BSID at the SRGW).
   o  The SRGW removes GTP, finds the SID list related to the IPv6 DA,
      and adds SRH with the SID list.
   o  There is no state for the downlink at the SRGW.
   o  There is simple state in the uplink at the SRGW; using Enhanced
      mode results in fewer SR policies on this node.  An SR policy is
      shared across UEs.
   o  When a packet from the UE leaves the gNB, it is SR-routed.  This
      simplifies network slicing [I-D.ietf-lsr-flex-algo].
   o  In the uplink, the IPv6 DA BSID steers traffic into an SR policy
      when it arrives at the SRGW-UPF1.

   An example topology is shown in Figure 5.

   S1 and C1 are two service segments.  S1 represents a VNF in the
   network, and C1 represents a router configured for Traffic
   Engineering.

                                  +----+
                IPv6/GTP         -| S1 |-                            ___
   +--+  +-----+ [N3]           / +----+ \                          /
   |UE|--| gNB |-         SRv6 /   SRv6   \ +----+   +------+ [N6] /
   +--+  +-----+ \        [N9]/     VNF    -| C1 |---| UPF2 |------\  DN
           GTP    \ +------+ /              +----+   +------+       \___
                   -| UPF1 |-                SRv6      SRv6
                    +------+                  TE
                   SR Gateway

       Figure 5: Enhanced mode with unchanged gNB IPv6/GTP behavior

5.3.1.1.  Packet flow - Uplink

   The uplink packet flow is as follows:





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   UE_out  : (A,Z)
   gNB_out : (gNB, B)(GTP: TEID T)(A,Z)       -> Interface N3 unmodified
                                                 (IPv6/GTP)
   SRGW_out: (SRGW, S1)(U2::1, C1; SL=2)(A,Z) -> B is an End.M.GTP6.D
                                                 SID at the SRGW
   S1_out  : (SRGW, C1)(U2::1, C1; SL=1)(A,Z)
   C1_out  : (SRGW, U2::1)(A,Z)               -> PSP
   UPF2_out: (A,Z)                            -> End.DT4 or End.DT6

   The UE sends a packet destined to Z toward the gNB on a specific
   bearer for that session.  The gNB, which is unmodified, encapsulates
   the packet into IPv6, UDP and GTP headers.  The IPv6 DA B, and the
   GTP TEID T are the ones received in the N2 interface.

   The IPv6 address that was signaled over the N2 interface for that UE
   PDU Session, B, is now the IPv6 DA.  B is an SRv6 Binding SID at the
   SRGW.  Hence the packet is routed to the SRGW.

   When the packet arrives at the SRGW, the SRGW identifies B as an
   End.M.GTP6.D Binding SID (see Section 6.3).  Hence, the SRGW removes
   the IPv6, UDP and GTP headers, and pushes an IPv6 header with its own
   SRH containing the SIDs bound to the SR policy associated with this
   BindingSID.  There is one instance of the End.M.GTP6.D SID per PDU
   type.

   S1 and C1 perform their related Endpoint functionality and forward
   the packet.

   When the packet arrives at UPF2, the active segment is (U2::1) which
   is bound to End.DT4/6.  UPF2 then decapsulates (removing the outer
   IPv6 header with all its extension headers) and forwards the packet
   toward the data network.

5.3.1.2.  Packet flow - Downlink

   The downlink packet flow is as follows:

   UPF2_in : (Z,A)                           -> UPF2 maps the flow with
                                                <C1, S1, SRGW::TEID,gNB>
   UPF2_out: (U2::1, C1)(gNB, SRGW::TEID, S1; SL=3)(Z,A) -> H.Encaps.Red
   C1_out  : (U2::1, S1)(gNB, SRGW::TEID, S1; SL=2)(Z,A)
   S1_out  : (U2::1, SRGW::TEID)(gNB, SRGW::TEID, S1, SL=1)(Z,A)
   SRGW_out: (SRGW, gNB)(GTP: TEID=T)(Z,A)   -> SRGW/96 is End.M.GTP6.E
   gNB_out : (Z,A)

   When a packet destined to A arrives at the UPF2, the UPF2 performs a
   lookup in the table associated to A and finds the SID list <C1, S1,
   SRGW::TEID, gNB>.  The UPF2 performs an H.Encaps.Red operation,



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   encapsulating the packet into a new IPv6 header with its
   corresponding SRH.

   C1 and S1 perform their related Endpoint processing.

   Once the packet arrives at the SRGW, the SRGW identifies the active
   SID as an End.M.GTP6.E function.  The SRGW removes the IPv6 header
   and all its extensions headers.  The SRGW generates new IPv6, UDP and
   GTP headers.  The new IPv6 DA is the gNB which is the last SID in the
   received SRH.  The TEID in the generated GTP header is an argument of
   the received End.M.GTP6.E SID.  The SRGW pushes the headers to the
   packet and forwards the packet toward the gNB.  There is one instance
   of the End.M.GTP6.E SID per PDU type.

   Once the packet arrives at the gNB, the packet is a regular IPv6/GTP
   packet.  The gNB looks for the specific radio bearer for that TEID
   and forward it on the bearer.  This gNB behavior is not modified from
   current and previous generations.

5.3.1.3.  Scalability

   For the downlink traffic, the SRGW is stateless.  All the state is in
   the SRH inserted by the UPF2.  The UPF2 must have the UE states since
   it is the UE's session anchor point.

   For the uplink traffic, the state at the SRGW does not necessarily
   need to be unique per PDU Session; the SR policy can be shared among
   UEs.  This enables more scalable SRGW deployments compared to a
   solution holding millions of states, one or more per UE.

5.3.2.  Interworking with IPv4 GTP

   In this interworking mode the gNB uses GTP over IPv4 in the N3
   interface

   Key points:

   o  The gNB is unchanged and encapsulates packets into GTP (the N3
      interface is not modified).
   o  In the uplink, traffic is classified by SRGW's Uplink Classifier
      and steered into an SR policy.  The SRGW is a UPF1 functionality
      and can coexist with UPF1's Uplink Classifier functionality.
   o  SRGW removes GTP, finds the SID list related to DA, and adds a SRH
      with the SID list.

   An example topology is shown in Figure 6.  In this mode the gNB is an
   unmodified gNB using IPv4/GTP.  The UPFs are SR-aware.  As before,
   the SRGW maps the IPv4/GTP traffic to SRv6.



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   S1 and C1 are two service segment endpoints.  S1 represents a VNF in
   the network, and C1 represents a router configured for Traffic
   Engineering.

                                  +----+
                IPv4/GTP         -| S1 |-                            ___
   +--+  +-----+ [N3]           / +----+ \                          /
   |UE|--| gNB |-         SRv6 /   SRv6   \ +----+   +------+ [N6] /
   +--+  +-----+ \        [N9]/     VNF    -| C1 |---| UPF2 |------\  DN
           GTP    \ +------+ /              +----+   +------+       \___
                   -| UPF1 |-                SRv6      SRv6
                    +------+                  TE
                   SR Gateway

       Figure 6: Enhanced mode with unchanged gNB IPv4/GTP behavior

5.3.2.1.  Packet flow - Uplink

   The uplink packet flow is as follows:

   gNB_out : (gNB, B)(GTP: TEID T)(A,Z)          -> Interface N3
                                                    unchanged IPv4/GTP
   SRGW_out: (SRGW, S1)(U2::1, C1; SL=2)(A,Z)    -> H.M.GTP4.D function
   S1_out  : (SRGW, C1)(U2::1, C1; SL=1)(A,Z)
   C1_out  : (SRGW, U2::1) (A,Z)                 -> PSP
   UPF2_out: (A,Z)                               -> End.DT4 or End.DT6

   The UE sends a packet destined to Z toward the gNB on a specific
   bearer for that session.  The gNB, which is unmodified, encapsulates
   the packet into a new IPv4, UDP and GTP headers.  The IPv4 DA, B, and
   the GTP TEID are the ones received at the N2 interface.

   When the packet arrives at the SRGW for UPF1, the SRGW has an Uplink
   Classifier rule for incoming traffic from the gNB, that steers the
   traffic into an SR policy by using the function H.M.GTP4.D.  The SRGW
   removes the IPv4, UDP and GTP headers and pushes an IPv6 header with
   its own SRH containing the SIDs related to the SR policy associated
   with this traffic.  The SRGW forwards according to the new IPv6 DA.

   S1 and C1 perform their related Endpoint functionality and forward
   the packet.

   When the packet arrives at UPF2, the active segment is (U2::1) which
   is bound to End.DT4/6 which performs the decapsulation (removing the
   outer IPv6 header with all its extension headers) and forwards toward
   the data network.





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5.3.2.2.  Packet flow - Downlink

   The downlink packet flow is as follows:

   UPF2_in : (Z,A)                            -> UPF2 maps flow with SID
                                               <C1, S1,SRGW::SA:DA:TEID>
   UPF2_out: (U2::1, C1)(SRGW::SA:DA:TEID, S1; SL=2)(Z,A) ->H.Encaps.Red
   C1_out  : (U2::1, S1)(SRGW::SA:DA:TEID, S1; SL=1)(Z,A)
   S1_out  : (U2::1, SRGW::SA:DA:TEID)(Z,A)
   SRGW_out: (SA, DA)(GTP: TEID=T)(Z,A)       -> End.M.GTP4.E
   gNB_out : (Z,A)

   When a packet destined to A arrives at the UPF2, the UPF2 performs a
   lookup in the table associated to A and finds the SID list <C1, S1,
   SRGW::SA:DA:TEID>.  The UPF2 performs a H.Encaps.Red operation,
   encapsulating the packet into a new IPv6 header with its
   corresponding SRH.

   The nodes C1 and S1 perform their related Endpoint processing.

   Once the packet arrives at the SRGW, the SRGW identifies the active
   SID as an End.M.GTP4.E function.  The SRGW removes the IPv6 header
   and all its extensions headers.  The SRGW generates an IPv4, UDP and
   GTP headers.  The IPv4 SA and DA are received as SID arguments.  The
   TEID in the generated GTP header is also the arguments of the
   received End.M.GTP4.E SID.  The SRGW pushes the headers to the packet
   and forwards the packet toward the gNB.

   When the packet arrives at the gNB, the packet is a regular IPv4/GTP
   packet.  The gNB looks for the specific radio bearer for that TEID
   and forward it on the bearer.  This gNB behavior is not modified from
   current and previous generations.

5.3.2.3.  Scalability

   For the downlink traffic, the SRGW is stateless.  All the state is in
   the SRH inserted by the UPF.  The UPF must have this UE-base state
   anyway (since it is its anchor point).

   For the uplink traffic, the state at the SRGW is dedicated on a per
   UE/session basis according to an Uplink Classifier.  There is state
   for steering the different sessions in the form of a SR Policy.
   However, SR policies are shared among several UE/sessions.








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5.3.3.  Extensions to the interworking mechanisms

   In this section we presented three mechanisms for interworking with
   gNBs and UPFs that do not support SRv6.  These mechanisms are used to
   support GTP over IPv4 and IPv6.

   Even though we have presented these methods as an extension to the
   "Enhanced mode", it is straightforward in its applicability to the
   "Traditional mode".

   Furthermore, although these mechanisms are designed for interworking
   with legacy RAN at the N3 interface, these methods could also be
   applied for interworking with a non-SRv6 capable UPF at the N9
   interface (e.g.  L3-anchor is SRv6 capable but L2-anchor is not).

5.4.  SRv6 Drop-in Interworking

   In this section we introduce another mode useful for legacy gNB and
   UPFs that still operate with GTP-U.  This mode provides an
   SRv6-enabled user plane in between two GTP-U tunnel endpoints.

   In this mode we employ two SRGWs that map GTP-U traffic to SRv6 and
   vice-versa.

   Unlike other interworking modes, in this mode both of the mobility
   overlay endpoints use GTP-U.  Two SRGWs are deployed in either N3 or
   N9 interface to realize an intermediate SR policy.


                               +----+
                              -| S1 |-
   +-----+                   / +----+ \
   | gNB |-            SRv6 /   SRv6   \ +----+   +--------+    +-----+
   +-----+  \              /     VNF    -| C1 |---| SRGW-B |----| UPF |
      GTP[N3]\ +--------+ /              +----+   +--------+    +-----+
              -| SRGW-A |-                SRv6   SR Gateway-B     GTP
               +--------+                  TE
              SR Gateway-A


             Figure 7: Example topology for SRv6 Drop-in mode

   The packet flow of Figure 7 is as follows:








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gNB_out : (gNB, U::1)(GTP: TEID T)(A,Z)
GW-A_out: (SRGW-A, S1)(U::1, SGB::TEID, C1; SL=3)(A,Z) ->U::1 is an
                                                         End.M.GTP6.D.Di
                                                         SID at SRGW-A
S1_out  : (SRGW-A, C1)(U::1, SGB::TEID, C1; SL=2)(A,Z)
C1_out  : (SRGW-A, SGB::TEID)(U::1, SGB::TEID, C1; SL=1)(A,Z)
GW-B_out: (SRGW-B, U::1)(GTP: TEID T)(A,Z)             ->U1b::TEID is an
                                                         End.M.GTP6.E
                                                         SID at SRGW-B
UPF_out : (A,Z)

   When a packet destined to Z to the gNB, which is unmodified, it
   performs encapsulation into a new IP, UDP and GTP headers.  The IPv6
   DA, U::1, and the GTP TEID are the ones received at the N2 interface.

   The IPv6 address that was signaled over the N2 interface for that PDU
   Session, U::1, is now the IPv6 DA.  U2b:: is an SRv6 Binding SID at
   SRGW-A.  Hence the packet is routed to the SRGW.

   When the packet arrives at SRGW-A, the SRGW identifies U2b:: as an
   End.M.GTP6.D.Di Binding SID (see Section 6.4).  Hence, the SRGW
   removes the IPv6, UDP and GTP headers, and pushes an IPv6 header with
   its own SRH containing the SIDs bound to the SR policy associated
   with this Binding SID.  There is one instance of the End.M.GTP6.D.Di
   SID per PDU type.

   S1 and C1 perform their related Endpoint functionality and forward
   the packet.

   Once the packet arrives at SRGW-B, the SRGW identifies the active SID
   as an End.M.GTP6.E function.  The SRGW removes the IPv6 header and
   all its extensions headers.  The SRGW generates new IPv6, UDP and GTP
   headers.  The new IPv6 DA is U::1 which is the last SID in the
   received SRH.  The TEID in the generated GTP header is an argument of
   the received End.M.GTP6.E SID.  The SRGW pushes the headers to the
   packet and forwards the packet toward UPF2b.  There is one instance
   of the End.M.GTP6.E SID per PDU type.

   Once the packet arrives at UPF2b, the packet is a regular IPv6/GTP
   packet.  The UPF looks for the specific rule for that TEID to forward
   the packet.  This UPF behavior is not modified from current and
   previous generations.

6.  SRv6 Segment Endpoint Mobility Behaviors







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6.1.  Args.Mob.Session

   Args.Mob.Session provide per-session information for charging,
   buffering and lawful intercept (among others) required by some mobile
   nodes.  The Args.Mob.Session argument format is used in combination
   with End.Map, End.DT and End.DX behaviors.  Note that proposed format
   is applicable for 5G networks, while similar formats could be
   proposed for legacy networks.

      0                   1                   2                   3
      0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |   QFI     |R|U|                PDU Session ID                 |
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
     |PDU Sess(cont')|
     +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

                          Args.Mob.Session format

   o  QFI: QoS Flow Identifier [TS.38415]
   o  R: Reflective QoS Indication [TS.23501].  This parameter indicates
      the activation of reflective QoS towards the UE for the
      transferred packet.  Reflective QoS enables the UE to map UL User
      Plane traffic to QoS Flows without SMF provided QoS rules.
   o  U: Unused and for future use.  MUST be 0 on transmission and
      ignored on receipt.
   o  PDU Session ID: Identifier of PDU Session.  The GTP-U equivalent
      is TEID.

   Arg.Mob.Session is required in case that one SID aggregates multiple
   PDU Sessions.  Since the SRv6 SID is likely NOT to be instantiated
   per PDU session, Args.Mob.Session helps the UPF to perform the
   behaviors which require per QFI and/or per PDU Session granularity.

6.2.  End.MAP

   The "Endpoint behavior with SID mapping" behavior (End.MAP for short)
   is used in several scenarios.  Particularly in mobility, End.MAP is
   used in the UPFs for the PDU Session anchor functionality.

   When a SR node N receives a packet destined to S and S is a local
   End.MAP SID, N does the following:

   1.    Lookup the IPv6 DA in the mapping table
   2.    update the IPv6 DA with the new mapped SID            ;; Ref1
   3.    IF segment_list > 1
   4.       insert a new SRH
   5.    forward according to the new mapped SID



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   Ref1: The SIDs in the SRH are NOT modified.

6.3.  End.M.GTP6.D

   The "Endpoint behavior with IPv6/GTP decapsulation into SR policy"
   behavior (End.M.GTP6.D for short) is used in interworking scenario
   for the uplink toward from the legacy gNB using IPv6/GTP.  Suppose,
   for example, this SID is associated with an SR policy <S1, S2, S3>
   and an IPv6 Source Address A.

   When the SR Gateway node N receives a packet destined to S and S is a
   local End.M.GTP6.D SID, N does:

    1. IF NH=UDP & UDP_DST_PORT = GTP THEN
    2.    copy TEID to form SID S3
    3.    pop the IPv6, UDP and GTP headers
    4.    push a new IPv6 header with a SR policy in SRH <S1, S2, S3>
    5.    set the outer IPv6 SA to A
    6.    set the outer IPv6 DA to S1
    7.    set the outer IPv6 NH                                  ;; Ref1
    8.    forward according to the S1 segment of the SRv6 Policy
    9. ELSE
   10.    Drop the packet

   Ref1: The NH is set based on the SID parameter.  There is one
   instantiation of the End.M.GTP6.D SID per PDU Session Type, hence the
   NH is already known in advance.  For the IPv4v6 PDU Session Type, in
   addition we inspect the first nibble of the PDU to know the NH value.

   The prefix of last segment (S3 in above example) SHOULD be followed
   by an Arg.Mob.Session argument space which is used to provide the
   session identifiers.

   The prefix of A SHOULD be an End.M.GTP6.E SID instantiated at an SR
   gateway.

6.4.  End.M.GTP6.D.Di

   The "Endpoint behavior with IPv6/GTP decapsulation into SR policy for
   Drop-in Mode" behavior (End.M.GTP6.D.Di for short) is used in SRv6
   drop-in interworking scenario described in Section 5.4.  The
   difference between End.M.GTP6.D as another variant of IPv6/GTP
   decapsulation function is that the original IPv6 DA of GTP packet is
   preserved as the last SID in SRH.  Suppose, for example, this SID is
   associated with an SR policy <S1, S2, S3> and an IPv6 Source Address
   A.





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   When the SR Gateway node N receives a packet destined to S and S is a
   local End.M.GTP6.D.Di SID, N does:

   1. IF NH=UDP & UDP_DST_PORT = GTP THEN
   2.    preserve S and copy TEID to form SID S3
   3.    pop the IPv6, UDP and GTP headers
   4.    push a new IPv6 header with a SR policy in SRH <S1, S2, S3, S>
   5.    set the outer IPv6 SA to A
   6.    set the outer IPv6 DA to S1
   7.    set the outer IPv6 NH                                  ;; Ref1
   8.    forward according to the S1 segment of the SRv6 Policy
   9. ELSE
   10.    Drop the packet

   Ref1: The NH is set based on the SID parameter.  There is one
   instantiation of the End.M.GTP6.D.Di SID per PDU Session Type, hence
   the NH is already known in advance.  For the IPv4v6 PDU Session Type,
   in addition we inspect the first nibble of the PDU to know the NH
   value.

   The prefix of last segment(S3 in above example) SHOULD be followed by
   an Arg.Mob.Session argument space which is used to provide the
   session identifiers.

   The prefix of A SHOULD be an End.M.GTP6.E SID instantiated at an SR
   gateway.

6.5.  End.M.GTP6.E

   The "Endpoint behavior with encapsulation for IPv6/GTP tunnel"
   behavior (End.M.GTP6.E for short) is used in interworking scenario
   for the downlink toward the legacy gNB using IPv6/GTP.

   The prefix of End.M.GTP6.E SID MUST be followed by the
   Arg.Mob.Session argument space which is used to provide the session
   identifiers.

   When the SR Gateway node N receives a packet destined to S, and S is
   a local End.M.GTP6.E SID, N does the following:












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    1. IF NH=SRH & SL = 1  THEN                                ;; Ref1
    2.    store SRH[0] in variable new_DA
    3.    store TEID in variable new_TEID from IPv6 DA         ;; Ref2
    4.    pop IP header and all its extension headers
    5.    push new IPv6 header and GTP-U header
    6.    set IPv6 DA to new_DA
    7.    set IPv6 SA to A
    8.    set GTP_TEID to new_TEID
    9.    lookup the new_DA and forward the packet accordingly
   10. ELSE
   11.    Drop the packet

   Ref1: An End.M.GTP6.E SID MUST always be the penultimate SID.

   Ref2: TEID is extracted from the argument space of the current SID.

   The source address A SHOULD be an End.M.GTP6.D SID instantiated at an
   SR gateway.

6.6.  End.M.GTP4.E

   The "Endpoint behavior with encapsulation for IPv4/GTP tunnel"
   behavior (End.M.GTP4.E for short) is used in the downlink when doing
   interworking with legacy gNB using IPv4/GTP.

   When the SR Gateway node N receives a packet destined to S and S is a
   local End.M.GTP4.E SID, N does:

   1. IF (NH=SRH and SL = 0) or ENH=4 THEN
   2.    store IPv6 DA in buffer S
   3.    store IPv6 SA in buffer S'
   4.    pop the IPv6 header and its extension headers
   5.    push UDP/GTP headers with GTP TEID from S
   6.    push outer IPv4 header with SA, DA from S' and S
   7. ELSE
   8.    Drop the packet

   The End.M.GTP4.E SID in S has the following format:

       0                                                         127
       +-----------------------+-------+----------------+---------+
       |  SRGW-IPv6-LOC-FUNC   |IPv4DA |Args.Mob.Session|0 Padded |
       +-----------------------+-------+----------------+---------+
              128-a-b-c            a            b           c


                         End.M.GTP4.E SID Encoding




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   S' has the following format:

       0                                                         127
       +----------------------+--------+--------------------------+
       |  Source UPF Prefix   |IPv4 SA | any bit pattern(ignored) |
       +----------------------+--------+--------------------------+
                128-a-b            a                  b


                     IPv6 SA Encoding for End.M.GTP4.E

6.7.  H.M.GTP4.D

   The "SR Policy Headend with tunnel decapsulation and map to an SRv6
   policy" behavior (H.M.GTP4.D for short) is used in the direction from
   legacy IPv4 user-plane to SRv6 user-plane network.

   When the SR Gateway node N receives a packet destined to a IW-
   IPv4-Prefix, N does:

   1. IF Payload == UDP/GTP THEN
   2.    pop the outer IPv4 header and UDP/GTP headers
   3.    copy IPv4 DA, TEID to form SID B
   4.    copy IPv4 SA to form IPv6 SA B'
   5.    encapsulate the packet into a new IPv6 header   ;;Ref1
   6.    set the IPv6 DA = B
   7.    forward along the shortest path to B
   8. ELSE
   9.    Drop the packet

   Ref1: The NH value is identified by inspecting the first nibble of
   the inner payload.

   The SID B has the following format:

       0                                                         127
       +-----------------------+-------+----------------+---------+
       |Destination UPF Prefix |IPv4DA |Args.Mob.Session|0 Padded |
       +-----------------------+-------+----------------+---------+
              128-a-b-c            a            b           c


                          H.M.GTP4.D SID Encoding

   The SID B MAY be an SRv6 Binding SID instantiated at the first UPF
   (U1) to bind a SR policy [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-policy].





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   The prefix of B' SHOULD be an End.M.GTP4.E SID with its format
   instantiated at an SR gateway with the IPv4 SA of the receiving
   packet.

6.8.  End.Limit: Rate Limiting behavior

   The mobile user-plane requires a rate-limit feature.  For this
   purpose, we define a new behavior "End.Limit".  The "End.Limit"
   behavior encodes in its arguments the rate limiting parameter that
   should be applied to this packet.  Multiple flows of packets should
   have the same group identifier in the SID when those flows are in an
   same AMBR (Aggregate Maximum Bit Rate) group.  The encoding format of
   the rate limit segment SID is as follows:

              +----------------------+----------+-----------+
              | LOC+FUNC rate-limit  | group-id | limit-rate|
              +----------------------+----------+-----------+
                    128-i-j                i          j

             End.Limit: Rate limiting behavior argument format

   If the limit-rate bits are set to zero, the node should not do rate
   limiting unless static configuration or control-plane sets the limit
   rate associated to the SID.

7.  SRv6 supported 3GPP PDU session types

   The 3GPP [TS.23501] defines the following PDU session types:

   o  IPv4
   o  IPv6
   o  IPv4v6
   o  Ethernet
   o  Unstructured

   SRv6 supports the 3GPP PDU session types without any protocol
   overhead by using the corresponding SRv6 behaviors (End.DX4, End.DT4
   for IPv4 PDU sessions; End.DX6, End.DT6, End.T for IPv6 PDU sessions;
   End.DT46 for IPv4v6 PDU sessions; End.DX2 for L2 and Unstructured PDU
   sessions).

8.  Network Slicing Considerations

   A mobile network may be required to implement "network slices", which
   logically separate network resources.  User-plane behaviors
   represented as SRv6 segments would be part of a slice.





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   [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-policy] describes a solution to
   build basic network slices with SR.  Depending on the requirements,
   these slices can be further refined by adopting the mechanisms from:

   o  IGP Flex-Algo [I-D.ietf-lsr-flex-algo]
   o  Inter-Domain policies
      [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-central-epe]

   Furthermore, these can be combined with ODN/AS
   [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-policy] for automated slice
   provisioning and traffic steering.

   Further details on how these tools can be used to create end to end
   network slices are documented in
   [I-D.ali-spring-network-slicing-building-blocks].

9.  Control Plane Considerations

   This document focuses on user-plane behavior and its independence
   from the control plane.

   The control plane could be the current 3GPP-defined control plane
   with slight modifications to the N4 interface [TS.29244].

   Alternatively, SRv6 could be used in conjunction with a new mobility
   control plane as described in LISP [I-D.rodrigueznatal-lisp-srv6],
   hICN [I-D.auge-dmm-hicn-mobility-deployment-options] or in
   conjunction with FPC [I-D.ietf-dmm-fpc-cpdp].  The analysis of new
   mobility control-planes and its applicability to an SRv6 user-plane
   is out of the scope of this document.

   Section 11 allocates SRv6 Segment Endpoint Behavior codepoints for
   the new behaviors defined in this document.

10.  Security Considerations

   The security considerations for Segment Routing are discussed in
   [RFC8402].  More specifically for SRv6 the security considerations
   and the mechanisms for securing an SR domain are discussed in
   [RFC8754].  Together, they describe the required security mechanisms
   that allow establishment of an SR domain of trust to operate
   SRv6-based services for internal traffic while preventing any
   external traffic from accessing or exploiting the SRv6-based
   services.

   The technology described in this document is applied to a mobile
   network that is within the SR Domain.




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   This document introduces new SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors.  Those
   behaviors do not need any especial security consideration given that
   it is deployed within that SR Domain.

11.  IANA Considerations

   IANA is requested to allocate, within the "SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors"
   sub-registry belonging to the top-level "Segment Routing Parameters"
   registry [I-D.ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming], the following
   values:

              +-------+-----+-------------------+-----------+
              | Value | Hex | Endpoint behavior | Reference |
              +-------+-----+-------------------+-----------+
              | TBA   | TBA |      End.MAP      | [This.ID] |
              | TBA   | TBA |    End.M.GTP6.D   | [This.ID] |
              | TBA   | TBA |   End.M.GTP6.Di   | [This.ID] |
              | TBA   | TBA |    End.M.GTP6.E   | [This.ID] |
              | TBA   | TBA |    End.M.GTP4.E   | [This.ID] |
              | TBA   | TBA |     End.Limit     | [This.ID] |
              +-------+-----+-------------------+-----------+

          Table 1: SRv6 Mobile User-plane Endpoint Behavior Types

12.  Acknowledgements

   The authors would like to thank Daisuke Yokota, Bart Peirens,
   Ryokichi Onishi, Kentaro Ebisawa, Peter Bosch, Darren Dukes, Francois
   Clad, Sri Gundavelli, Sridhar Bhaskaran, Arashmid Akhavain, Ravi
   Shekhar, Aeneas Dodd-Noble and Carlos Jesus Bernardos for their
   useful comments of this work.

13.  Contributors

   Kentaro Ebisawa
   Toyota Motor Corporation
   Japan

   Email: ebisawa@toyota-tokyo.tech

   Tetsuya Murakami
   Arrcus, Inc.
   United States of America

   Email: tetsuya.ietf@gmail.com






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14.  References

14.1.  Normative References

   [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-policy]
              Filsfils, C., Sivabalan, S., Voyer, D., Bogdanov, A., and
              P. Mattes, "Segment Routing Policy Architecture", draft-
              ietf-spring-segment-routing-policy-07 (work in progress),
              May 2020.

   [I-D.ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming]
              Filsfils, C., Camarillo, P., Leddy, J., Voyer, D.,
              Matsushima, S., and Z. Li, "SRv6 Network Programming",
              draft-ietf-spring-srv6-network-programming-16 (work in
              progress), June 2020.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

   [RFC8402]  Filsfils, C., Ed., Previdi, S., Ed., Ginsberg, L.,
              Decraene, B., Litkowski, S., and R. Shakir, "Segment
              Routing Architecture", RFC 8402, DOI 10.17487/RFC8402,
              July 2018, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8402>.

   [RFC8754]  Filsfils, C., Ed., Dukes, D., Ed., Previdi, S., Leddy, J.,
              Matsushima, S., and D. Voyer, "IPv6 Segment Routing Header
              (SRH)", RFC 8754, DOI 10.17487/RFC8754, March 2020,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8754>.

   [TS.23501]
              3GPP, "System Architecture for the 5G System", 3GPP TS
              23.501 15.0.0, November 2017.

14.2.  Informative References

   [I-D.ali-spring-network-slicing-building-blocks]
              Ali, Z., Filsfils, C., Camarillo, P., and D. Voyer,
              "Building blocks for Slicing in Segment Routing Network",
              draft-ali-spring-network-slicing-building-blocks-02 (work
              in progress), November 2019.









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   [I-D.auge-dmm-hicn-mobility-deployment-options]
              Auge, J., Carofiglio, G., Muscariello, L., and M.
              Papalini, "Anchorless mobility management through hICN
              (hICN-AMM): Deployment options", draft-auge-dmm-hicn-
              mobility-deployment-options-04 (work in progress), July
              2020.

   [I-D.camarilloelmalky-springdmm-srv6-mob-usecases]
              Camarillo, P., Filsfils, C., Elmalky, H., Matsushima, S.,
              Voyer, D., Cui, A., and B. Peirens, "SRv6 Mobility Use-
              Cases", draft-camarilloelmalky-springdmm-srv6-mob-
              usecases-02 (work in progress), August 2019.

   [I-D.ietf-dmm-fpc-cpdp]
              Matsushima, S., Bertz, L., Liebsch, M., Gundavelli, S.,
              Moses, D., and C. Perkins, "Protocol for Forwarding Policy
              Configuration (FPC) in DMM", draft-ietf-dmm-fpc-cpdp-13
              (work in progress), March 2020.

   [I-D.ietf-lsr-flex-algo]
              Psenak, P., Hegde, S., Filsfils, C., Talaulikar, K., and
              A. Gulko, "IGP Flexible Algorithm", draft-ietf-lsr-flex-
              algo-08 (work in progress), July 2020.

   [I-D.ietf-spring-segment-routing-central-epe]
              Filsfils, C., Previdi, S., Dawra, G., Aries, E., and D.
              Afanasiev, "Segment Routing Centralized BGP Egress Peer
              Engineering", draft-ietf-spring-segment-routing-central-
              epe-10 (work in progress), December 2017.

   [I-D.ietf-spring-sr-service-programming]
              Clad, F., Xu, X., Filsfils, C., daniel.bernier@bell.ca,
              d., Li, C., Decraene, B., Ma, S., Yadlapalli, C.,
              Henderickx, W., and S. Salsano, "Service Programming with
              Segment Routing", draft-ietf-spring-sr-service-
              programming-02 (work in progress), March 2020.

   [I-D.rodrigueznatal-lisp-srv6]
              Rodriguez-Natal, A., Ermagan, V., Maino, F., Dukes, D.,
              Camarillo, P., and C. Filsfils, "LISP Control Plane for
              SRv6 Endpoint Mobility", draft-rodrigueznatal-lisp-srv6-03
              (work in progress), January 2020.

   [TS.29244]
              3GPP, "Interface between the Control Plane and the User
              Plane Nodes", 3GPP TS 29.244 15.0.0, December 2017.





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   [TS.29281]
              3GPP, "General Packet Radio System (GPRS) Tunnelling
              Protocol User Plane (GTPv1-U)", 3GPP TS 29.281 15.1.0,
              December 2017.

   [TS.38415]
              3GPP, "Draft Specification for 5GS container (TS 38.415)",
              3GPP R3-174510 0.0.0, August 2017.

Appendix A.  Implementations

   This document introduces new SRv6 Endpoint Behaviors.  These
   behaviors have an open-source P4 implementation available in
   <https://github.com/ebiken/p4srv6>.

   Additionally, a full implementation of this document is available in
   Linux Foundation FD.io VPP project since release 20.05.  More
   information available here: <https://docs.fd.io/vpp/20.05/d7/d3c/
   srv6_mobile_plugin_doc.html>.

   There are also experimental implementations in M-CORD NGIC and Open
   Air Interface (OAI).

Authors' Addresses

   Satoru Matsushima (editor)
   SoftBank
   Tokyo
   Japan

   Email: satoru.matsushima@g.softbank.co.jp


   Clarence Filsfils
   Cisco Systems, Inc.
   Belgium

   Email: cf@cisco.com


   Miya Kohno
   Cisco Systems, Inc.
   Japan

   Email: mkohno@cisco.com






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   Pablo Camarillo Garvia (editor)
   Cisco Systems, Inc.
   Spain

   Email: pcamaril@cisco.com


   Daniel Voyer
   Bell Canada
   Canada

   Email: daniel.voyer@bell.ca


   Charles E. Perkins
   Futurewei Inc.
   2330 Central Expressway
   Santa Clara, CA  95050
   USA

   Phone: +1-408-330-4586
   Email: charliep@computer.org





























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